COLUMN:Let the music play

Noah Pearson, Columnist Follow them at @tbhimscared

Noah Pearson, Columnist

Follow them at @tbhimscared

This is a challenge to the entire E.C. student and faculty body that does not take any advantage of the music programming that the school offers to start doing so. 

Some non-majors have gone so far as to not show up to music events, and then criticise the music majors for not participating in sporting events that are completely removed from the diverse traditions and various curriculums of the music department. 

Overall, it’s pretty pathetic.

According to a column published in the last edition of The Leader, the football team does not appear intimidating and football games are boring due to the lack of a marching band. 

I’m sure these people know how to play football, but as a music major, it seems suspect to me that the lack of intimidation and spectacle at football games is the responsibility of a party that has nothing to do with football. It comes off as a cop out and uses the music department as a scapegoat. 

It makes sense that someone in sports may not have an understanding of what makes our music program “internationally renowned,” but it is completely unfair for anyone who does not actively participate in music or even attend events to propose a dramatic change in how the program is run and offer baseless criticism that few in the music department care to hear. 

Our “internationally renowned” music program exists as well as a free invitation to every student at E.C. to attend.

One of the great, if not only, traditions of Elmhurst College is the magnitude of talent provided to the campus through the annual jazz fest.

Whether it be for education or for entertainment, whether they are jazz giants with multiple Grammy’s to name or a random Elmhurst College student, people in droves pack the chapel to be a part of a jazz fest that has proven to be a foundational part of what makes Elmhurst, Elmhurst. 

Throughout the entire year, students and guest artists work tirelessly to perfect their craft and provide entertaining and enriching music to E.C. and the greater Elmhurst community. Any given music major will participate in anywhere from 10 to 17 concerts in one semester.

Live music is a time honored tradition and among the best, if not the best way to hear and experience music. There is history, there is an authenticity that cannot be replicated through recordings.

As the director takes the stage both the audience roar with applause and the members of the ensemble stomp their feet. 

The director recognizes the group and takes a proud bow before the music begins and an eager silence washes over the crowd waiting for the downbeat and the ride to begin.

As the show goes on, the audience is taken through an emotional journey. Soloists stand proud at the end of every piece to have their talent recognized, audience members cheer, whistle, wipe tears, and stand as the group plays their last notes to one last time show their appreciation of the talent and work of the artists on stage. 

Close your eyes and you can imagine this exact scene taking place in auditoriums across the country.

This becomes difficult when you refuse to see it for yourself. 

E.C. is a school with exceptional musicians, exceptional directors, exceptional libraries, but an audience composed of very few people outside of the department. 

As a part of the curriculum, music majors are required to attend at least eight concerts a semester, which admittedly brings an audience to concerts that would not otherwise have a large turnout. However, due to the work that music majors put into their own ensembles, they recognize the importance of appreciating the work of their peers. Many music majors exceed the number of required concerts by the time the semester is over due to the fact that they enjoy watching their peers perform anyway.

The program is not represented because the student body refuses to take part in traditions actual musicians are very content in upholding. If you care about how the music department is represented, it is up to you to own up to your apathy and do something about it.