World in Review

Iraqi vehicles pass through destroyed apartment buildings in war-torn Mosul. Internet Photo

Iraqi vehicles pass through destroyed apartment buildings in war-torn Mosul. Internet Photo

by Kenneth Edison, Managing Editor
Follow him on Twitter: @Krazo1

Iraqi military forces began a new front in Western Mosul on May 4 in an effort to push the Islamic State out of the long contested city.  

According to the New York Times, the Iraqi army’s Ninth Division was pulled from other assignments to push into Mosul from the north, forcing ISIS to fight from two fronts.

The fighting has caused anxiety in the homes of the trapped civilians in Iraqi-occupied eastern Mosul who dare not flee the area in such dangerous times. 

Though the new tactic seems to offer a beacon of hope to the desperate civilians still inhabiting the urban battlegrounds, the effort will require careful synchronization between the Iraqi military and the federal police who have publicly been at odds with each other in the past.

 

Internet photo President Donald Trump and his cabinent brainstorm ideas new health care plan to replace Obamacare.

Internet photo

President Donald Trump and his cabinent brainstorm ideas new health care plan to replace Obamacare.

Congress republicans celebrated with President Donald Trump on May 4 after passing the American Health Care Act, thus repealing Obamacare. 

According to CNBC, the American Health Care Act aims to reduce costs by allowing states the option to opt out of Obamacare insurance benefit requirements. 

Trump promised citizens shortly after passing the new health care plan that premiums would go down under this new plan.

“I tell you, people suffered so badly with the ravages of Obamacare. As far as I’m concerned your premiums will come down,” he said. “This will get passed through the Senate. I’m so confident.”

Opponents of the bill have voiced their concerns with the opt-in system, arguing that it leaves far too much uncertainty with the future of U.S. health care. 

As Kevin Counihan, a former chief of HealthCare.gov explained, “We just don’t know how big the number of states [that will opt in]. Two is fine. Fifteen — not close to enough.”