World in Review: O'Reilly, French elections, North Korea

By Kenneth Edison, Managing Editor

FOX News fires news anchor Bill O’Reilly

Internet photo Bill O’Reilly was fired from FOX News network on Wednesday, April 19 because of sexual harassment claims.

Internet photo

Bill O’Reilly was fired from FOX News network on Wednesday, April 19 because of sexual harassment claims.

FOX News anchor Bill O’Reilly was fired from his position with the company on Wednesday April 19 after a slew of sexual harassment claims. 

According to the New York Times, O’Reilly had been accused of sexual harassment and had been sued for it on five different occasions, each time settling out of court. 

After the Times published an article about those cases on April 1, an internal investigation into O’Reilly’s past instances of sexual harassment revealed several more allegations against him.

After reading the investigation report the Murdoch family, who own and control FOX News’ parent company 21st Century Fox, made the decision to part ways with O’Reilly. 

“After a thorough and careful review of the allegations, the company and Bill O’Reilly have agreed that Bill O’Reilly will not be returning to the Fox News Channel,” 21st Century Fox said in a statement.

In a statement that very same day, O’Reilly was complimentary of his now former employers saying, “I will always look back on my time at Fox with great pride in the unprecedented success we achieved and with my deepest gratitude to all my dedicated viewers. I wish only the best for Fox News Channel.”

The French elections favor the conservative candidate

Internet photo Far-right French Presidential candidate Marine Le Pen cheers with crowd at rally.

Internet photo

Far-right French Presidential candidate Marine Le Pen cheers with crowd at rally.

The future of France and potentially the entire European union will be decided with the beginning of the French Presidential election, the first phase of which begins of April 23.

According to the New York Times, France’s election is held in two phases: the first of which will include 11 candidates. After this phase, the two top voted candidates will move on to a second runoff election that will begin in early May.

As of now there are four top candidates who are in a dead heat that is too close to call: Marine Le Pen of the far-right National Front party, Emmanuel Macron a centrist independent, Francois Fillion the traditional conservative candidate and Jean-Luc Melenchon a far-left tech enthusiast. 

In the aftermath of Brexit in 2016, these elections in France could be the deciding factor for the future of the European Union as some candidates such as Le Pen and Melenchon have advocated for drastic changes to France’s relationship with the EU.

Other issues such as immigration and national defense will also play key roles in who voters decide to cast their ballots for, all of which will be heavily influenced by the recent terror attack in Paris on April 20 where a man opened fire on police officers.

As of midday Sunday early polls favor Le Pen and Macron to win the first round, winning 24.3 percent and 21.4 percent of the vote respectively.

North Korea threatens Australia with nuclear strike

A spokesman for the North Korean government issued a threat of nuclear attack against Australia on Sunday April 23 in response to comments by Australian officials.

Following a statement by Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop where she voiced her nation’s support of the US’ stance on North Korea, the regime responded with a threat of nuclear action. 

According to ABC News the North Korean spokesman accused Australia of, “blindly and zealously toeing the US line.” He would go on to say, “If Australia persists in following the US’ moves to isolate and stifle North Korea … this will be a suicidal act of coming within the range of the nuclear strike of the strategic force of North Korea.” 

North Korea already possess missiles that are theoretically capable of reaching as far as Japan and is rumored to have plans of developing longer range missiles that would be able to reach northern Australia. 

In response to the threat, Bishop said that the entire ordeal “underlines the need for the regime to abandon its illegal nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programs.”