The Leader’s top 10 must see films of 2017

By Andrew Cripe, Movie Critic

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The Florida Project

If you see one film from 2017, make it Sean Baker’s extraordinary “The Florida Project.” Featuring unforgettable performances from Brooklynn Prince and Bria Vinaite, this movie will make you experience every emotion that a film can possibly conjure up. Don’t miss it.

 

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Blade Runner 2049

Denis Villeneuve’s sequel to “Blade Runner” would make Stanley Kubrick and Andrei Tarkovsky proud. This is easily one of the most visually stunning films ever created. Poetic, slow-burning, and utterly captivating. 

 

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Dunkirk

Christopher Nolan’s most impressive film to date, “Dunkirk” is an experiment in sustained tension, harrowing filmmaking, and epic scope. This is one of the most impressive war films of this generation. 

 

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mother!

Darren Aronofsky’s disturbing, shocking, unforgiving film brought art-house psychological horror to a mainstream audience. Millions of viewers were confounded by it, but one thing is for certain; if you watch “mother!”, you will not walk away unfazed. 

 

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The Killing of a Sacred Deer

Yorgos Lanthimos takes the freezing-cold bluntness of his previous films (“The Lobster,” “Dogtooth,” “Alps”) and runs wild with it in this distressing yet oddly wonderful film. It’s a surreal cinematic experience, and it will draw your attention to its marvelous, confident filmmaking as often as it shakes you to your core.

 

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Get Out

The cinematic success story of 2017, Jordan Peele’s relevant, unpredictable horror film interrogates viewers as much as it entertains. This isn’t a film that settles for cheap shock-violence and mindless twists, but aims for what makes audiences most uncomfortable about their own nature. 

 

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Logan

Arguably the saddest superhero film ever made, James Mangold’s “Logan” is 100% daring. It is a bleak, violent futuristic western that takes everything we know about Wolverine (Hugh Jackman) and subverts it into something equally devastating and poignant. 

 

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War for the Planet of the Apes

The strangest summer blockbuster in years, and that couldn’t be a bigger compliment. Artistic, quiet, and beautifully acted, Matt Reeve’s conclusion to the most recent “Apes” trilogy is a swan-song, packed with an overwhelming sense of finality and touches of tear-jerking compassion. 

 

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Logan Lucky

Maybe the year’s most entertaining and unexpectedly funny film, Steven Soderbergh’s return to feature filmmaking is a more than welcome return. He hasn’t lost a step, and the cast is uniformly exceptional.

 

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Detroit

One of the year’s most important films, Kathryn Bigelow’s examination of the 1967 Detroit riots is borderline traumatic. A hard-hitting, ruthless exploration of corruption and racism.

 

Honorable Mentions:

Come Swim (dir. Kristen Stewart); Song to Song (dir. Terrence Malick); American Made (dir. Doug Liman); It (dir. Andy Muschietti); John Wick: Chapter 2 (dir. Chad Stahelski); Wonder Woman (dir. Patty Jenkins); The Lost City of Z (dir. James Gray)

 

Worst Film of the Year: “The Snowman”

Tomas Alfredson’s “The Snowman” is an obscene, sickening waste of time, talent, and resources. This is not a finished film, and the fact it was released to audiences is an insult. It’s barely even a proof-of-concept. This is an incomprehensible, nauseating, relentlessly boring dumpster-fire of a film. It’s not even bad enough to warrant a curiosity-watch. Avoid at all costs.